Dance Teams

Sowerby Bridge Morris Dancers

After the success of the early Sowerby Bridge rushbearings in the late 1970s, there was pressure for the town to also develop its own dance side. The result, in 1979, was the Sowerby Bridge Morris Dancers. Originally an all-male Northwest side, they were a regular feature of rushbearing until 2002 when dwindling numbers made performing impossible. In 2012 the team was resurrected as a mixed side and set about learning the original team's repertoire. In the 4 years since they have written two original dances, Jubilee Diamond and Rushcart. In 2014 they added Whalley and Colne Royal, both traditional dances from the now disbanded Colne Royal Morris Men.

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Ryburn Longsword

Ryburn Longsword formed in 1994. Their team is mostly drawn from the town of Ripponden and we are pleased to have had them perform at the last 23 Rushbearing festivals. Over the years Ryburn have established quite a reputation amongst the folk dance fraternity. They perform in the dance style traditional to Yorkshire and boast both a senior and junior team who appear at a range of events, both in and out of the region. Ryburn have done sterling work over the years encouraging youth participation in folk dance and folk arts.

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Four Hundred Roses

Formed in 2005, 400 Roses are a unique group of performers from across the region that combine UK-style folk dancing with more exotic tribal belly dance moves. When designing their costumes they decided to use an abundance of red and white silk roses appropriate to their Yorkshire & Lancashire origins, hence their name. They have been wowing the rushbearing crowds since 2008.

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Bradshaw Mummers

The Bradshaw Mummers began as a 'one-off' entertainment in 1972 and haven't yet thought of a good reason to stop. They began performing at Rushbearing in the early 1980s and have been a well-loved fixture ever since. Essentially a street theatre group, they perform traditional and contemporary plays based on the medieval mumming traditions of death and re-birth and the triumph of good over evil. They will be presenting two different plays over the course of the weekend - do not miss them!

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White Rose Morris Men*

White Rose was originally formed in the autumn of 1953 by a number of Leeds University Morris Men and others who wished to form a non-university side. The White Rose dancers are a familiar sight in their distinctive 'whites' with green baldrics and straw hats. White Rose promotes the South Midlands (or Cotswold) tradition 'up North' and have performed in at many venues both home and abroad including Sweden, Jersey, Provence and Romania.

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Hebden Bridge Hill Millies*

The Hill Millies are an all-female team from the nearby town of Hebden Bridge. Since forming over a decade ago they have danced in the Cotswold morris tradition as taught to them by the landlord of their local Fox & Goose public house. They have been performing at Rushbearing since 2007 and we are pleased to welcome them back again this year as they continue their mission to 'Entertain and educate the community with traditional music and dance.'

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Hexadaisy Morris*

The ladies of Hexadaisy are grown in and around Huddersfield and flower from April through to late September. Although a relatively new team, having been formed in 2013, they are flourishing and have already built up a notable reputation for the quality of their dancing. Hexadaisy can be seen at a host of events around West Yorkshire. They dance in white and green in the Bampton and Oddington styles in the Cotswold tradition.

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Brighouse Scottish Dance Club*

Whether you are new to Scottish dancing or an experienced performer, you will be welcome at the Brighouse Scottish Dance Club. A well-established organisation, affiliated to the RSCDS, the club is now into its 60th year of dancing. They are a friendly group with members of all ages. The club holds weekly dance meetings and regular monthly performances which include, three times a year, accompaniment by a top ranked professional band. We're happy to welcome them to their first rushbearing.

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Leeds Morris Men*

Leeds Morris Men are a West Yorkshire side performing in the Cotswold style of southern England. They have been morris dancing for several decades and mainly dance out in kit in the summer months. They perform in a variety of locations, mainly outside pubs around the Leeds area, along with various festivals and weekends of dance. For the last 65 years they've hosted a weekend of celebration and dance around a host of villages in the Yorkshire Dales.

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Clerical Error

Clerical Error first performed in 1991 and came to perform at Rushbearing shortly afterwards. Dancing in the Border Morris style, they perform mostly stick dances plus one dance with hankies - 3 Jolly Black Sheepskins. Their fine dance team is enhanced by the inclusion of the dragon who refers to himself as Idris. A lean, mean modern beast, he inspires fear in all. With excellent dances and fine musicians, we are pleased to welcome them back to the festival this year.

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Forest of Dean Morris Men

The Forest of Dean once contained many Morris sides and this current team are a revival side performing the unique style of dances specific to the area. Their membership ranges from about 15 to 80+ years of age. During the Spring and Summer the team dances out most Wednesday evenings at pubs in the Forest of Dean and Wye Valley. Over the years they have performed at countless fetes, shows and special events including festivals and tours in the UK as well as Germany, France and Belgium.

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Herring Gals

The Herring Gals is very much a family affair. Wives and daughters of Grimsby Morris Men, they were tired of watching them have all the fun so made a team of their own. They comprise 3 sets of mothers and daughters and one set of sisters which makes practices interesting! The team dances North-west morris using garlands, sticks and handkerchiefs. The Herring Gals' dresses are identical apart for the inserts which are tailored to individual interests from Alice in Wonderland to musical notes and dressmaking.

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Mortimers Morris

Mortimer's Morris is a lively women's side based in Nottingham. They perform dances from the North-west tradition with enthusiasm and great style. In addition, Mortimer's band contributes a unique sound with tunes from across Europe on a variety of traditional instruments. With a distinctive kit in black, green and purple, Mortimer's Morris have become a familiar sight at prestigious events throughout the country and we are always happy to welcome them back to rushbearing.

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Poynton Jemmers

Poynton Jemmers are one of the oldest women's North-west morris sides in the country. Jemmers were formed in 1975 to revive and perform the traditional women`s morris dances of Cheshire and Lancashire. Many of their dances were collected from members of teams in existence in the early part of the 20th century. Over the years they have evolved a unique style by adapting and expanding the tradition. Why Jemmers? The people of the former mining village of Poynton were once so poor that they had to live on bread and jam - hence the name 'Jammers' or colloquially 'Jemmers'.

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Sutton Masque

Founded in 2014, Sutton Masque are a border morris side from Sutton-in-the-Isle in the southern reaches of the Cambridgeshire fens. The side was founded by residents of Sutton but has now expanded to include members from as far afield as Witchford & Chatteris. They are a mixed side and claim they will come and dance at any event, large or small, which is lucky for us! The summer usually sees them performing at a number of pubs local to Cambridgeshire and occasionally beyond.

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*Saturday only    **Sunday only